Royal Victoria Hospital

Introduction

Department of Cardiac Surgery, Royal Hospitals Trust

About the Unit

The Royal Hospitals is Northern Ireland’s biggest and best known hospitals complex. Almost two thirds of the Northern Ireland population live within 40 minutes travel from the 70 acre site which is situated only a few minutes drive from Belfast city centre.The Cardiac Surgery Unit at the Royal Hospitals Trust is a specialised regional service, established in 1968, serving a Northern Ireland population of 1.7 million.

Services provided

Adult Cardiac Surgery
Thoracic Surgery
Congenital Cardiac Surgery

Rehabilitation and follow up

We have 4 phases of rehabilitation. Support and information is given to patients and families about all aspects of heart disease. Once the patient has gone home we will call to see how they are managing and visit where necessary. The patient then returns to hospital to attend an exercise and education programme. Support after this time will be community based.

Access

Bus 95 runs from Donegall Square East regularly. At the visitors' car park you pay before returning to your car. Disabled spaces and set down points are provided near the outpatients’ centre.

Visiting hours

Ward visiting is 15.00-17.00 and 19.30-21.00 with a quiet time between 13.00 and 14.00. No fixed hours for intensive care, but ideally before 21.00.

Location

Department of Cardiac Surgery,
Royal Hospitals Trust,
274 Grosvenor Road,
Belfast,
BT12 6BA

Tel: +44 (0) 28 9024 0503

Trust Website: http://www.belfasttrust.hscni.net/hospitals/RVHIntro.htm

 

Cardiac Outcomes

Number and type of operations performed

This graph shows the number and percentage of each type of heart surgery done by this consultant surgeon. The number of operations is shown in the line going up the left hand side. The percentage (%) underneath each coloured bar shows how much of this consultant's heart surgery is made up each procedure type.

The 'key' underneath the graph shows what procedure(s) each coloured bar shows. The abbreviations used are explained below:

  • Isolated: This procedure has been carried out on its own. No other procedures were done during the same operation.
  • CABG: Coronary artery bypass grafting
  • AVR: Aortic valve replacement
  • MV: Mitral valve procedure

You can find out more about these procedures in the 'About cardiothoracic surgery' section. If you or someone you know if having heart surgery, it may be helpful to know whether the consultant does lots of that procedure. If you have questions or concerns about the number of procedures being done at your hospital, you should speak to your heart surgeon.

Click here for help understanding this graph


In-hospital survival rate (risk adjusted)

This graph shows the percentage of patients who survived their operation and left hospital alive. This is the 'In-hospital survival rate'. Some patients are more unwell than others and some need more complex operations. Hence, hospitals and consultants perform a range of cardiac operations and the type of patients they operate on can differ. So that we can make fair comparisons between them, the survival rates have been 'risk adjusted' to take into account the illness of the patient and the complexity of the operation. The dot on the graph shows the risk-adjusted survival for the unit/surgeon you have selected and the number of operations performed over the last 3 year period. The blue line indicates the predicted survival and the red dotted lines the range of results expected, worked out by complex statistics.

For more information on understanding mortality rates, look at the Understanding the graphs page

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Average patient risk profile

Some risk factors like age, gender, and other medical problems can affect the outcome of heart surgery.

Each of the graphs below shows what percentage of this consultant's patients have each risk factor (light blue bar on the left) next to the average for the whole of the UK (dark blue bar on the right). This can tell you whether the consultant operates on high risk patients in general, and whether they specialise in doing particular types of complicated surgery, like operations on the thoracic aorta.

You can find out more about the risk factors in the 'About cardiothoracic surgery' section.

Click here for help understanding this graph


Thoracic Outcomes

Thoracic surgery units also undertake surgery for lung cancer, and other cancers within the chest such as thymoma or mesothelioma, collapsed lungs known as pneumothorax, major infections and to biopsy suspicious areas, among other surgery. The SCTS collects data on these other operations in the thoracic registry. Some data for this hospital from the 2016-17 audit year* is given below;

Cases Performed
Primary lung cancer resections all primary lung cancer resections 188
Total thoracic surgery excluding endoscopy all case (excluding endoscopy) 571
Did this hospital perform radical surgery for mesothelioma in 2015-16? yes
Did this hospital perform chest wall deformity (pectus) surgery in 2015-16? yes